Nissan to sell electricity from renewable energy to employees in Japan

Last month, Nissan announced its long-term vision, Nissan Ambition 2030, to meet evolving environmental, societal and customer needs.

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. today announced it will sell electricity generated from virtually 100% renewable energy to its employees in Japan as parts of its carbon-neutrality efforts. The program will first be made available to employees living in the Kanto region at the start of fiscal year 2022.

Based on the results of field tests utilizing electric vehicles, Nissan will also identify the ideal business partner to offer attractive power pricing plans to owners of Nissan EVs such as the Nissan LEAF and Nissan Ariya.

Nissan

To promote home-charging by EV users, Nissan began to sell electricity through selected dealerships in 2019. With a view toward future energy management based around EVs, Nissan has also been engaging in various field tests utilizing them in partnership with energy companies.

Nissan has announced that it aims to become carbon neutral throughout the life cycle of its products by 2050. Toward this end, it is working on delivering zero emissions across all aspects of its operations, including development, manufacturing and sales. Nissan is also preparing a business model using electricity from renewable energy that leverages the high-capacity storage capabilities of its EV batteries.

Last month, Nissan announced its long-term vision, Nissan Ambition 2030, to meet evolving environmental, societal and customer needs. To become a truly sustainable company, Nissan is driving toward a cleaner, safer and more inclusive world. Building on its electrification strategy, over the next 10 years Nissan aims to deliver many exciting EVs and technological innovations while globally expanding its operations.

Positioning electrification at the core of its business, Nissan will use its wealth of experience to take a ground-breaking and comprehensive approach to accelerate initiatives toward achieving carbon neutrality.

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